Vasectomy Reversal

Vasectomy Reversal

While vasectomy should be considered a permanent form of birth control, it may be possible to reconnect or unblock the vas deferens, allowing the return of sperm to your ejaculate. Just as in getting a vasectomy, the decision to pursue vasectomy reversal should be made only after discussion with your physician about the likelihood of success, the risks of surgery, and the details of your health or life situation.

Types of reversal surgeries

Vasectomy reversal is usually performed in an outpatient setting or surgery center. It typically does not require a hospital stay. Reversal is more difficult than a vasectomy itself. Your doctor will likely chose one of two common methods: vasovasostomy, in which the two ends of the severed vas deferens are reconnected, or vasoepidiymostomy, in which the vas deferens is connected directly to the tube on the back of each testicle (the epididymis). A vasoepdiymostomy is more complicated than a vasovasostomy, and is usually performed only if a vasovasostomy cannot be done.

Your doctor’s decision about which procedure to perform will be made once the procedure begins and your doctor can determine the health of your vas deferens and sperm. During the procedure, you will be under local anesthesia. Your doctor will make a small incision in your scrotum to access the testicles and examine the condition of your vas deferens.

Similar to the vasectomy, after the procedure you will be sent home to recover using ice packs and mild pain relief medications. You will need to take it easy for several days as the swelling and discomfort subsides. Your doctor will give you complete post-operative instructions. Sexual activity should not resume without your doctor’s OK.

The Return of Fertility

Vasectomy reversal is considered successful if sperm returns to the ejaculate, which can take several months, and sometimes a year or more. Your doctor will examine your ejaculate about six weeks after surgery to determine if sperm is present. These examinations will continue every two or three months—unless, of course, your partner becomes pregnant. In general, vasectomy reversal success rates decline as time passes from the original vasectomy.

Academic Urology Locations

  • Brinton Lake

    Crozer Medical Plaza
    500 Evergreen Dr.,
    Glen Mills, PA 19342
    610-579-3577

  • Bryn Mawr

    919 Conestoga Rd
    Building 1, Suite 300
    Bryn Mawr, PA 19010
    610-525-6580

  • Center for Pelvic Medicine, LLC

    919 Conestoga Rd
    Building 1, Suite 301
    Bryn Mawr, PA 19010
    610-525-0541

  • Coatesville

    213 Reeceville Rd
    Coatesville, PA 19320
    610-383-7663

  • Glen Mills

    100 Maris Grove Way
    Glen Mills, PA 19342
    610-565-2776

  • King of Prussia

    211 S. Gulph Rd.
    King of Prussia, PA 19406
    610-382-5900

  • Lansdale

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    Suite 122
    Lansdale, PA 19446
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  • Media

    200 East State Street
    Suite 205
    Media, PA 19063
    610-565-2776

  • Paoli

    2 Industrial Boulevard
    Building C, Suite 120
    Paoli, PA 19301
    610-647-3660

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    Suite 301
    Phoenixville, PA 19460
    610-935-9010

  • Pottstown

    20 Sunnybrook Road
    Pottstown, PA 19464
    610-323-5550

  • Sellersville

    711 Lawn Avenue
    Building 2
    Sellersville, PA 18960
    215-257-1050

  • The Prostate Center

    211 South Gulph Rd.
    Suite 200
    King of Prussia, PA 19406
    610-382-5900

  • West Chester

    915 Old Fern Hill Road
    Building B
    West Chester, PA 19380
    610-692-4270

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